Advocacy

MEDICAL ASSOCIATION OF GEORGIA
GEORGIA GENERAL ASSEMBLY (2021)
KEY BILLS SUMMARY (2021)

The following is a summary of the key health care legislation that MAG tracked during the 2021 General Assembly…

MAG PRIORITY: COVID-19 RELIEF

H.B. 112 by Rep. Trey Kelley (R-Cedartown) will extend the COVID-19 liability protections that were enacted in the state in 2020 by one year (i.e., until July 14, 2022). MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 592 by Rep. Matthew Wilson (D-Brookhaven) would have clarified the definition of “gross negligence” under the COVID-19 liability legislation by stating that it “includes, but is not limited to, failure to comply with guidance promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor regarding workplace COVID-19 prevention programs.” MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass.

MAG PRIORITY: HEALTH INSURANCE

S.B. 1 by Sen. Dean Burke, M.D. (R-Bainbridge) would have expanded the list of entities that are required to submit data to the Georgia All Payer Claims Database once it is up and running. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

S.B. 43 by Sen. Matt Brass (R-Newnan) will prevent insurers from requiring an ophthalmologist or optometrist to accept a certain amount for eye care services that are not covered under the patient’s eye care benefit plan as a condition to join or participate in its provider network. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Passed.

S.B. 80 by Sen. Kay Kirkpatrick, M.D. (R-Marietta) will improve the prior authorization process by 1) making insurers and PBMs more transparent, including requiring them to post information on pending process/requirements changes on their website before the changes go into effect and 2) requiring physicians to have a chance to speak to a physician or other health care provider who works for the utilization review entity and who is in the same or similar specialty that typically manages the condition or disease in question and who has knowledge providing the service or treatment under review when medical necessity is questioned and prior to rendering appeals decisions and 3) requiring insurers to respond to prior authorization requests within 15 calendar days between January 1, 2022 and December 31, 2022 and within seven days after January 1, 2023 for non-urgent care and within 72 hours for urgent care and 4) preventing insurers and PBMs from revoking, denying or changing a prior authorization approval for 45 days unless the prior authorization is for a Schedule II controlled substance. Failure to comply with the deadlines in this legislation will result in automatic authorization. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

S.B. 82 by Sen. Michelle Au, M.D. (D-Duluth) would have prohibited insurers from denying coverage for emergency care based solely on the final diagnosis. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

S.B. 103 by Sen. Donzella James (D-Atlanta) would have required insurers to treat diagnostic examinations for breast cancer no less favorably than screening examinations for breast cancer with respect to cost-sharing requirements and treatment limitations. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

S.B. 181 by Sen. Jen Jordan (D-Atlanta) would have reduced out-of-pocket costs for patients requiring insulin. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 49 by Rep. Shelly Hutchinson (D-Snellville) would have required insurers to treat claims concerning mental and substance use disorders the same way they do other health insurance claims. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 73 by Rep. Carolyn Hugley (D-Columbus) would have capped the amount that an insured patient can be required to pay for a covered insulin prescription at $50 per 30-day supply. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 115 by Rep. Mike Wilensky (D-Dunwoody) would have prohibited insurers from using information derived from genetic testing for any nontherapeutic purpose in the absence of a diagnosis of a condition related to such information. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 164 by Rep. Demetrius Douglas (D-Stockbridge) would have required health insurers to provide their enrollees with no less than 80 percent of the prescription drug rebates that are related to the enrollee’s prescriptions that the insurer receives from third parties. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 234 by Rep. Lee Hawkins (R-Gainesville) will allow self-funded health care plans, which are exempt from state regulation under federal law, to opt into Georgia’s Surprise Billing Consumer Protection Act (H.B. 888 from 2020). MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 307 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta) will codify the ‘Georgia Telehealth Act.’ This includes 1) authorizing health care providers to provide telemedicine services from home and 2) authorizing patients to receive telemedicine services from their home, workplace, or school and 3) allowing for audio-only care under certain circumstances and 4) prohibiting any insurance requirements for patients to have an in-person consultation before they receive telemedicine services except in certain circumstances and 5) prohibiting more stringent utilization review requirements. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 321 by Rep. Yasmin Neal (D-Jonesboro) would have required health care insurers to offer group health benefit plans to hospitals to provide health insurance coverage for uninsured hospital patients. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 447 and H.B. 448 by Rep. David Knight (R-Griffin) would have required every contract for health care coverage or services under the state health benefit plan or Medicaid or PeachCare for Kids Program to contain provisions relating to disclosure of cost data. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 454 by Rep. Mark Newton, M.D. (R-Augusta) will require insurers who advertise a provider as a participating provider in their provider directory when a person selects his or her health benefit plan to cover the provider charges at in-network rates for 180 days after the contract has ended for that covered person, regardless of whether the provider continues to participate in the insurer’s network. A covered patient will now not have to pay more than they would if the services are delivered by an in-network provider, although this will not apply when 1) the provider is removed from the network due to suspension, expiration, or revocation of their license or if they unilaterally opt out of the insurer’s network for reasons other than default or breach of contract or 2) the insurer terminates the contract for cause for fraud, misrepresentation, or other actions constituting a termination for cause under such provider’s contract or 3) an insurer notes that a provider will not out-of-network a specific date in its provider directory if the directory is posted on its website 15 days before the patient’s open enrollment date. The legislation also prohibits insurers from canceling contracts during or immediately following a public health emergency. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 509 by Rep. Houston Gaines (R-Athens) will require certain insurers to make at least one reasonably priced comprehensive major medical health insurance policy available to residents in the state without limitation or exclusion based on preexisting conditions if the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is repealed or invalidated. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 523 by Rep. Marvin Lim (D-Norcross) would have required health care providers and insurers to provide good faith estimates of costs and fees to patients upon request. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

MAG PRIORITY: TAX CREDITS FOR UNCOMPENSATED CARE

H.B. 42 by Rep. Kim Schofield (D-Atlanta) would have created a grant program to encourage certain physicians to practice in underserved areas of the state. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

MAG PRIORITY: PUBLIC HEALTH

S.B. 4 by Sen. Kay Kirkpatrick, M.D. (R-Marietta) will prohibit kickbacks, commissions, bribes, benefits, rebates, and bonuses by substance abuse providers or solicited by substance abuse providers to induce referral of a patient and outlaws fraudulent marketing techniques designed to deceive individuals into expensive long term recovery facilities. It will also prohibit ‘high-tech drug testing’ (i.e., testing an individual’s specimen for numerous substances and billing and receiving payment separately for each substance that is tested). MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

S.B. 46 by Sen. Dean Burke, M.D. (R-Bainbridge) will allow pharmacists to administer all Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended adult vaccines under a protocol with a physician. Pharmacists will be required to check the Georgia Immunization Registry (GRITS) for the patient’s immunization status before they administer these vaccines, and they will have to notify the patient’s primary care physician and record the vaccination in the GRITS system. This legislation is consistent with MAG policy (HOD Resolution 304C.20). This bill was also amended to include the language from a bill (H.B. 450) by Rep. Mark Newton, M.D. (R-Augusta) that will authorize the Georgia Department of Public Health to release deidentified data from the state’s Low THC Oil Patient Registry to government entities and other entities for research and other purposes and a bill (H.B. 275) by Lauren McDonald (R-Cumming) that will require random drug tests for certain firefighters, emergency medical services personnel, paramedics, and cardiac technicians and licensing/certifying emergency medical services personnel, paramedics, and cardiac technicians who have been convicted of a felony. MAG’s Position: Supported S.B. 46 and was neutral on H.B. 275 and H.B. 450Outcome: Passed.

S.B. 92 by Sen. Randy Robertson (R-Cataula) would have prohibited the sale to and by minors of drug products containing dextromethorphan. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

S.B. 164 by Sen. Chuck Hufstetler (R-Rome) would have modernized Georgia’s HIV laws by 1) aligning services and policies with best public health practices and 2) making certain conduct by an individual who has HIV unlawful if the conduct has a significant risk of transmission. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 287 by Rep. Bonnie Rich (R-Suwanee) will add tobacco and vapor products to the course on alcohol and drugs that is required for every K-12 student in the state each year. In addition, the Georgia Board of Education will be required to prescribe a course of study in human trafficking awareness for grades six through 12. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 394 by Rep. Ron Stephens (R-Savannah) would have 1) raised the tax on cigarettes from 37 cents per pack to $1.87 per pack of 20 cigarettes and 2) taxed cigars, loose, or smokeless tobacco, and alternative nicotine products at a rate of 39 percent of the wholesale cost price (the current rate is 23 percent for cigars and 10 percent for loose or smokeless tobacco – while there is no tax on alternative nicotine products) and 3) raised the tax on consumable vapor products from seven percent to 39 percent of the wholesale cost price. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 413 by Rep. Beth Camp (R-Concord) would have prohibited the state or local governments from requiring individuals to submit to vaccinations as a condition to certain actions if the vaccine does not meet certain conditions. MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass.

MAG PRIORITY: MEDICAID

S.B. 172 by Sen. Gloria Butler (D-Stone Mountain) would have authorized appropriations to expand Medicaid under the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 72 by Rep. Carolyn Hugley (D-Columbus) would have expanded postpartum Medicaid coverage from six months to one year. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 163 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta) will direct the Georgia Department of Community Health to submit a state plan amendment to implement an “express lane” enrollment feature for Medicaid and direct the Georgia Department of Human Services to automatically enroll and renew eligible children in Medicaid based on application data it receives for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 381 by Rep. Renitta Shannon (R-Decatur) would have required the Georgia Department of Community Health to allow mothers who give birth to retain their Medicaid eligibility for one year following the birth of their child. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 630 by Rep. James Beverly (R-Macon) would have authorized the state to appropriate money to expand Medicaid under the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and federal Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

MAG PRIORITY: SCOPE OF PRACTICE

S.B. 111 by Sen. Lester Jackson (D-Savannah) would have created a licensure and regulatory framework for community midwives. MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass.

S.B. 170 by Sen. Lester Jackson (D-Savannah) would have required health benefit policies to provide coverage for expenses incurred in home childbirth, including services provided by certified community health workers. MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 369 by Rep. Alan Powell (R-Hartwell), which was added to S.B. 92 by Sen. Randy Robertson (R-Cataula), would have 1) allowed APRNs and PAs to prescribe Schedule II drugs under a protocol agreement or job description (requirements varied between the two bills as to APRN and PA experience, which drugs could be prescribed, and whether prescriptions to minors were permitted) and 2) allowed APRNs and PAs who are acting under a protocol agreement or a job description to sign the affidavit for parking permits for persons with disabilities and 3) had nurse protocol agreements and job descriptions deemed approved by the Georgia Composite Medical Board (GCMB) if a supervising physician submits a protocol agreement or job description for a new APRN or PA and the protocol agreement or job description is identical to a protocol agreement or job description that was previously submitted by the supervising physician for another APRN or PA and was approved by GCMB if GCMB does not respond to the request within 10 days. MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 430 by Rep. Alan Powell (R-Hartwell) addressed APRN licensure and would have allowed APRNs and PAs to develop care plans for home health, order part-time or intermittent skilled nursing care, and apply for parking permits by mail for persons with disabilities. MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass (referred to the Georgia Occupational Regulation Review Council).

H.B. 591 by Rep. Don Hogan (R-St. Simon’s Island) would have authorized marriage and family therapists to perform emergency examinations of persons for involuntary evaluation and treatment for mental illness or alcohol or drug abuse. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 653 by Rep. Rick Jasperse (R-Jasper) will allow pharmacists to administer and interpret the results of COVID-19 antigen and serology tests for a one-year period after the conclusion of the federal public health emergency. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Passed.

MAG PRIORITY: TORT REFORM

S.B. 189 by Sen. Bill Cowsert (R-Athens) would have established factors for the courts to consider when deciding whether to bifurcate trials (i.e., have separate trials for liability and damages). MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

S.B. 190 by Sen. Bill Cowsert (R-Athens) would have eliminated “phantom damages” in medical malpractice trials by limiting damages to the amounts that are actually paid to health care providers on behalf of a claimant and those necessary to satisfy incurred but unpaid medical expenses. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 539 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta), having been stripped of its original language, would have required judges to bifurcate trials upon the motion of either party in medical malpractice cases (i.e., there would be separate trials to consider liability and damages). MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

OTHER

S.B. 5 by Sen. Kay Kirkpatrick, M.D. (R-Marietta) will 1) require the Georgia Composite Medical Board to establish rules and regulations for the in-office use of sedation in “MediSpas” and 2) prohibit anyone who does not have a license to practice dentistry to administer conscious sedation in a dental facility or during the practice of dentistry in a MediSpa. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

S.B. 19 by Sen. Gloria Butler (D-Stone Mountain) would have required surgical smoke evacuation systems in operating rooms in ambulatory surgery centers and hospitals. MAG’s Position: Monitored. Outcome: Did not pass.

S.B. 195 by Sen. Jeff Mullis (R-Chickamauga), which was amended to include the provisions of a bill (H.B. 645) by Rep. Micah Gravely (R-Douglasville), will update certain provisions in the state’s medical cannabis laws, including those related to retail dispensaries. The MAG Institute for Excellence in Medicine Medical Cannabis Task Force supports the H.B. 645 provisions because they believe it will result in a better distribution infrastructure and enhance patient safety. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

S.B. 256 
by Sen. Dean Burke, M.D. (R-Bainbridge) addressed whether county health boards would need to approve the hiring of district health directors. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

S.B. 270 by Sen. Gail Davenport (D-Jonesboro) would have created a pilot program to fund rural birthing centers associated with hospitals with emergency departments. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

S.B. 271 by Sen. Kay Kirkpatrick, M.D. (R-Marietta) would have allowed the Georgia Composite Medical Board to perform criminal background checks on every licensee. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass, but it was added to H.B. 245 – which did pass.

S.R. 151
 by Sen. Ed Harbison (R-Columbus) will create the Senate Sickle Cell Anemia Study Committee. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

S.R. 281 by Sen. Butch Miller (R-Gainesville) will create the Senate Study Committee on Violence Against Health Care Workers. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 34 by Rep. Dave Belton (R-Buckhead) will create a licensure and telemedicine compact for audiologists and speech language pathologists. Gov. Brian Kemp vetoed this legislation in 2020. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 93 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta) will 1) eliminate duplicative state licensure and regulatory requirements for clinical laboratories and 2) repeal some statutory provisions that are related to the examination of human specimens and methods for selecting blood donors and collection, storage, and the processing of human blood and 3) eliminate state inspections of clinical laboratories. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 99 by Rep. Ron Stephens (R-Savannah) would have allowed patients who have certain qualifying conditions (e.g., Crohn’s Disease and ulcerative colitis) and who obtain the requisite documentation to have access to restrooms that are not generally available to the public (i.e., employee-only). MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 117 by Rep. Mike Wilensky (D-Dunwoody) would have added ulcerative colitis to the list of conditions that qualify for a Georgia ‘Low THC Oil Registry’ card. The MAG Institute for Excellence in Medicine’s Cannabis Task Force reviewed this measure. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 135 by Rep. Rick Williams (R-Milledgeville) would have required a physician who is in charge of a “patient’s care for the illness or condition which resulted in death to complete, sign, and return the medical certification as to the cause and circumstances of death to the funeral director or person acting as such prior to or simultaneously with such funeral director or other person assuming custody of the dead body.” MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 290 by Rep. Ed Setzler (R-Acworth) would have required certain amounts of in-person contact for visitors, legal representatives, and essential caregivers for patients and residents in hospitals and long-term care facilities. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 304 by Rep. Jodi Lott (R-Evans) would have created a tax credit for medical equipment and supplies manufacturers and pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturers. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 316 by Rep. Ron Stephens (R-Savannah) will increase the pharmacist-to-pharmacy tech ratio from three to four for direct supervision in a pharmacy. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 395 by Rep. Dave Belton (R-Buckhead) will allow Georgia to join the Professional Counselors Licensure Compact. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 401 by Rep. Ginny Ehrhart (R-Marietta) would have made it a felony for any licensed medical professional to provide a minor with medications that induce transient or permanent infertility, including puberty suppressants, hormone therapy, and performing enumerated surgical procedures on minors (e.g., mastectomy, vasectomy, hysterectomy). MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 412 by Rep. Katie Dempsey (R-Rome) would have provided for the licensure of individuals who are in the practice of applied behavior analysis. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass (referred to the Georgia Occupational Regulation Review Council).

H.B. 450 by Rep. Mark Newton, M.D. (R-Augusta) would have authorized the Georgia Department of Public Health to release deidentified data from the state’s Low THC Oil Patient Registry to government entities and other entities for research and other purposes. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass, but it was was added to S.B. 46 – which did pass.

H.B. 458 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta) will 1) require GCMB members to participate in training and education that addresses sexual misconduct, sexual boundaries, and the impacts of trauma and implicit bias within three months of being appointed and 2) expand GCMB’s licensure and disciplinary authority in matters related to a licensee sexually assaulting a patient and 3) require physicians to take continuing education on professional boundaries and physician sexual misconduct and 4) require GCMB to develop and identify educational resources and materials for physicians, GCMB members, and GCMB staff to support a greater understanding of sexual misconduct, sexual boundaries, and impacts of trauma and implicit bias and 5) require every medical and osteopathic medical school in the state to include education and training that addresses professional boundaries and physician sexual misconduct and 6) require physicians, APRNs, and PAs to file a report with GCMB if they become aware of a physician who commits a sexual assault on a patient – and subjecting those who knowingly and willfully fail to do so to a fine of no less than $1,000 or greater than $5,000 and disciplinary action and 7) require GCMB’s annual report to include the number of physicians it investigates for sexual assault and the outcomes of those investigations, including whether GCMB refused, revoked, or suspended the physicians’ licenses or issued a private or public disciplinary order. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 474 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta) would have required physicians to prescribe an opioid antagonist if the amount of the opioid being prescribed is greater than or equal to 50 morphine milligram equivalents. The prescription would have had to be accompanied by “written information regarding the temporary effects of the opioid antagonist and techniques for administering the opioid antagonist and a warning that a person administering the opioid antagonist should call 911 immediately after administering the opioid antagonist.” MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 752 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta) would have established a psychiatric advance directive. It would have allowed a competent adult to express their preferences for mental health care treatment with written instructions and by designating an agent to make mental health care decisions on their behalf. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 552 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta) would have allowed a taxpayer to deduct the full amount paid for shares as a member of a health care sharing organization from Georgia taxable income. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 567 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta) will create the Newborn Screening and Genetics Advisory Committee to review and make recommendations to the Georgia Department of Public Health when a new disorder is added to the federal Recommended Uniform Screening Panel. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Passed.

H.B. 569 by Rep. Matthew Wilson (D-Brookhaven) would have prohibited the practice of conversion therapy by professional counselors, physicians, or psychologists. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 590 by Rep. Don Hogan (R-St. Simon’s Island) would have provided for a grant program to establish assisted outpatient treatment programs for persons with mental illness who struggle to maintain engagement with essential mental health treatment. MAG’s Position: Opposed. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 601 by Rep. Ron Stephens (R-Savannah) would have clarified that low THC oil, marijuana, and tetrahydrocannabinols do not include certain federally approved products and would remove Epidiolex as a Schedule V controlled substance. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass, but it was was added to S.B. 195 – which did pass.

H.B. 605 by Rep. Sharon Cooper (R-Marietta) would have provided for authorized electronic monitoring in long-term care facilities. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 627 by Rep. John LaHood (R-Valdosta) would have required athletic training students to be under the direct supervision of a physician or licensed athletic trainer, eliminated obsolete provisions related to athletic trainers, and revised and updated certification requirements. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 629 by Rep. Newton, M.D. (R-Augusta) would have eliminated the in-person examination requirement for contact lens prescriptions. MAG’s Position: Neutral. Outcome: Did not pass.

H.B. 645 by Rep. Micah Gravely (R-Douglasville) would have update provisions the state’s medical cannabis law relating to access to medical cannabis. MAG’s Position: Supported. Outcome: Did not pass, but it was added to S.B. 195 – which did pass.

MAG tracked more than 150 bills during the 2021 legislative session.

Contact Derek Norton at dnorton@mag.org or 678.303.9280 with questions related to the General Assembly.